preserving open space in ulster county
to benefit present and future generations

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Thank you everyone who attended, donated auction items or goods for this event:

Alternative Baker, Barbara Masterson, Community Compost Company, Dennis Douglas, Dressel Farms, Fox & Hound Wine & Spirits, Fred Mayo, Gardiner Brewing Company, Gardiner Liquid Merchantile, Glorie Orchards, G. Steve Jordan, Hardie Truesdale, Harvest Real Food Catering, Hudson Valley Drones, Hudson Valley Audio Visual, Huguenot Street Farm, Ignite Fitness, In Good Taste Spirit Shop, Inn at Kettleboro, Iza Trapani, Jenkins-Leuken Orchards, Jim and Mary Ottaway, Joan Barker, John Fischer Photography, José Moreno-Lacalle, Karl Family Farms, Keegan Ales, Kettleborough Cider House, Kiernan Farm, Matt Gillis Photography, Meadowscent Florist, Michael Gold/The Corporate Image, Old Ford Farm, Paws of Distinction, Phillies Bridge Farm Project, Rob Hare Furniture Maker, Sav-on Party Central, Storefront Gallery, SUNY New Paltz, Taliaferro Farms, Tantillo's Farm, Whitecliff Vineyards and Yard Owl...plus our volunteers! YOU make a difference!

On October 14, 2012, we honored Bob Taylor with our Annual Conservation Award at Apple Greens Golf Course with a banquet and over 100 people.
Thank you Bob for your years of dedication to protecting open space!


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WVLT Vice President, Robert Witkowski with Bob Taylor and Christine DeBoer, Executive Director

On Sunday, October 5th, we honored  Glenn Hoagland with our 2014 Conservation Award!

Glenn Hoagland photo by John Hayes webt

On Sunday, October 20th, 2013 at the Hare East Easement we honored Joan Burroughs with our annual Conservation Award.HareProperty2013 Chairs2WEB

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Joan has long been an advocate for open space protection.  As the great-granddaughter of Naturalist John Burroughs, she has maintained his legacy of conservation and protection of the natural world and spearheaded the four-year State and privately funded project to restore and expand hiking trails at Slabsides.  

She is currently on the board of directors at the John Burroughs Association.

This year's Honorary Committee included: Bob Anderberg, Anne Bienstock and Russell Gilmore, Peter Bienstock, Allan and Lynn Bowdery, Patricia and Richard Brooks, Donald Christian, Mary Collins, Glenn Hoagland, Jim Hoover, Sandra Hutton, John Jacobs, Cara Lee,  Jay LeFevre, John Jacobs, Paul Kellar, Ron Knapp, Annie O'Neill, Steve Rosenberg, Angela Sisson and Johanna Sokolov, Vivian and John Wadlin.

 

Make a donation today in honor of Joan.

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Image Courtesy of the D&H Canal Museum
Save the Date: June 1st, 2019
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Wallkill Valley Land Trust’s 9th Annual Houses on the Land Historic House Tour 

Rosendale and Beyond: Reshaping the Land -
Farmsteads, Cement Works and Canal Towns 
11:00 am - 4:30 pm  
Reception following 4:30pm - 6:00pm

This year’s tour explores the fascinating early history and industrial and cultural heritage of Rosendale and surrounding hamlets - High Falls, Cottekill, Binnewater, Lawrenceville, Bloomington and Eddyville - from its early agrarian Dutch settlements through its evolution into a prosperous industrial boom-town in the 19th century, to its recent resurgence as a thriving artistic community. The building of the D & H Canal to transport coal from Pennsylvania to the Hudson River and the discovery of natural “Rosendale” cement, prized for its exceptional durability, and later the Wallkill Valley Railroad, shaped the town and brought international prominence to the area.

The day begins with registration and a tour of the beautiful St. Peter’s Catholic Church. Among the other great historic sites open for tour-goers are Century House’s Colonial Revival interiors, a first in years, along with the Historical Society’s Museum, Carriage House and the Widow Jane Mine, as well as the DePuy Canal House, future home of the Historical Society’s D&H Canal Museum. Featured houses are among the area’s most important and interesting vernacular treasures dating from the early 18th to 20th  centuries. Highlighted are stone farmhouses, the Greek Revival aesthetic, and Italianate and Colonial Revival expressions of prestige and wealth. This program promises a unique and memorable experience!

A note about the logistics: This tour is largely self-guided. At registration (located at St. Peter's Church), you will be provided with a map of the homes and a booklet. Docents will welcome you at each featured location to share even more. It is highly recommended that you carpool during this house tour. 

Tickets $50 / $45 members by May 30; $55 / $50 members thereafter.   Volunteer: Take the tour for free and attend the reception! 

Ticket pick-up Day of Tour 10:30 am – 1:30 pm sharp at St. Peter’s Catholic Church (also Registration site), 1017 Keator Avenue, Rosendale, NY 12472.

Admission includes the reception and wine tasting at a private home. Proceeds to benefit WVLT’s land preservation efforts.  

 
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Thank you everyone who came out for the
House Tour on Saturday, June 3rd!
It was a lovely day and we so are so thankful to our homwoeners, volunteers and sponsors!
 
Proceeds benefit WVLT's land preservation efforts. 

The First Highway: Huguenot Homesteads from

New Paltz to Bontecoe

The 2017 focus on the Town of New Paltz coincided with the year-long celebration WVLT's 30th Anniversary. The closing reception was held at a private farm on the Land Trust’s first easement. The tour explored the fascinating legacy of New Paltz’s Huguenots and their expansion northward along the eastern banks of the Wallkill River to Bontecoe on the Esopus border. The “Patentees”  - as the first dozen settlers were called – built their houses on the terrace above the Wallkill River where vistas sweep west to the Shawangunk Mountains. Their descendants moved beyond New Paltz to cultivate the rich alluvial soil of the floodplain.

The tour began with a special program at Historic Huguenot Street. Also featured were seven of the town's important houses and farms from the early 18th century and the mid-20th. All were either built by Huguenot descendants or upon Huguenot lands. Included were early stone houses, a 1930s Federal-style stone dwelling, a stunning brick Greek revival beauty, a fanciful late 19th century manor house, and a soaring labrynthine barn converted for modern living. 

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Interested in sponsoring a future Tour? Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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